Harvesting the Seed

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He had never been an intended farmer

And, perhaps, Mr. Frost knew he never would be

Unintentionally up in the notches…working the land with hands calloused by tragedy

Cursed tractors, sullen cows, an unconditional hell’s paradise

Baskets of discoveries…In one’s own unmade garden

 

Trained to farm the land…Once gone…

I had no intention of going back.

Searching the pavement for creativity

poking about the neon

digging in dollar signs and dimes for deliberate self-discovery

The writings on the wall were slipping away into graffiti

So, maybe Mr. Frost had been an intended farmer, after all

His seeds of thought burning a hole in my pocket

His travels into struggle…

Left open for me green fields of self-discovery

 

Mother Has Had Enough!

Carnage of the woods. 

Mother has had enough!

The ducks have flown away.

And, those seeking refuge have no higher ground.

No higher hand.

It seems useless to call her bluff.

Mother has had enough!

When a U.S. Republican senator threw a snowball onto the Senate floor in late February of 2015, he used it to underscore his belief that human-made climate change was an alarmist conclusion. The snowball had been rolled from the Capitol grounds in Washington D.C., which, at the time, was experiencing an uncharacteristically cold winter…

If global warming was real, he posited, how could the nation’s capital experience such severe cold?

Warm temperatures in the Arctic cause the jet stream to take these wild swings, and when it swings farther south, that causes cold air to reach farther south. These swings tend to hang around for awhile, so the weather we have in the eastern United States, whether it’s cold or warm, tends to stay with us longer,” said, Jennifer Francis.

Beyond a need for more scarves and gloves, colder winters could have serious implications for North American farms.

In an op-ed published in Nature alongside the study, noted climate scientist Ana Bastos wrote that the warming temperatures have the potential to weaken vegetation and shorten spring growing periods. The study looked at crop yields recorded by the National Agricultural Statistics Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and found crop production declined by an average of one to four percent during warmer Arctic years. Some states, however, saw a decline of almost 20 percent.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/

 

the Enamel of Spring

Cavity to a relic bone…

cool cold sets in…dismal and encouraging.

Not among wealth but amid slothful home.

I am ravished in petty accolades.

Never left…unto my own.

Westerly winds itch at the hem of spring’s fertile making of a fool.

However, April promises an essential maverick.

Light of day eases winter’s shame.

Offspring from a December’s nap come out for play.

They clamor and clatter at the air and offer an after bite.

Too soon daylight turns to a fitful night.

the Grain of Hard Labor

Set upon a lonesome hill

A macrame of buildings and self-will.

Adeptly placed into landscape from the vacant window sill.

Communities of back-breaking promises.

Handed down chores.

Much too often,

the stoking of fire from within.

And, chipped among  the frail lead paint

above and below, a rustic hearth

A lost world in the grain of hard labor.

Absent but ever-present…

shallow silo…

broken apple carts.

What a chorus to this…

heavenly, family farm.

Motions beset by synchronicity.

An untouchable charm.