Say, no to paper tigers!

The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure, the process is its own reward.

Amelia Earhart

8 Cool Facts About Amelia Earhart
JULY 24, 2019

Amelia Earhart, the first woman to travel across the Atlantic by plane
Amelia Earhart
July 24th is Amelia Earhart Day! An aviation pioneer who broke numerous records, Amelia Earhart is a beloved figure in American history and an inspiration to adventurous boys and girls everywhere. Celebrate her day with your kids this summer, and discover ten cool facts about Amelia Earhart.

  1. Amelia Earhart was born on July 24, 1897.
    Her mother disagreed with society’s emphasis on raising quiet, prim little girls; she encouraged her daughters to engage in fun and activity.
  2. Amelia Earhart’s childhood nickname was Meelie.
    Meelie was an adventurous child and often had her little sister Grace (nicknamed Pidge) following her around as she climbed trees, hunted rats, and collected insects.
  3. Amelia Earhart built her own roller coaster.
    With her uncle’s help, Amelia built a wooden ramp, similar to a roller coaster she remembered from a St. Louis vacation. She zoomed off the homemade ramp in a wooden box, crashed, and got up bruised but excited, exclaiming to her little sister, “Oh, Pidge, it’s just like flying!
  4. Amelia Earhart was the sixteenth woman to get her pilot’s license.
    When she was just twenty-three, Amelia Earhart took her first airplane ride. It was just a few hundred feet, but from then on she was determined to learn to fly.
  5. Amelia Earhart was the first woman to travel across the Atlantic by plane.
    On June 17, 1928, she and a couple of male pilots flew from Newfoundland, Canada, all the way over to Wales, which took about 21 hours. Since Amelia had no experience in using plane instruments, she was simply a passenger on this flight. The pilots did give her the added task of keeping the flight log. This still proved historic and brought Amelia a hero’s welcome at home and a visit to the White House.
  6. Amelia Earhart was the second person and the first woman to fly solo nonstop across the Atlantic.
    Charles Lindbergh was the only one who had flown across the Atlantic Ocean solo, but Amelia Earhart proved herself equal to the task. Powerful winds battered her little plane during this flight, which lasted fourteen hours and fifty-six minutes. She also contended with mechanical issues before finally making it to a pasture in Northern Ireland.
  7. Amelia Earhart flew solo halfway across the Pacific.
    Breaking yet another record, Amelia was the first pilot to fly alone from Honolulu, Hawaii, to Oakland, California. Near the end of the uneventful flight, she listened to the radio broadcast of the Metropolitan Opera.
  8. Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific Ocean.
    In 1937, Amelia attempted to fly around the globe with one crew member, Fred Noonan. She completed most of the global journey, a distance of twenty-two thousand miles, and had just seven thousand to go.

Feminist Up Off Her Knees

Snow drift, brittle and sweet, a feminist up off her knees.

Amid a swollen flag…frost reacts while trying to appease.

The land of franchised trees holds no regard to changing seas.

Only unaccountable moments of living in distant a pleasing breeze.

I am a feminist…up off her knees.

“Believe more deeply. Hold your face up to the Light, although for the moment you do not see.”

Whether my limbs be sagging unto a coarse turf…

I am the women of mother’s earth.

Pea coat in slender glove hand.

Spread before me is my land.

 

the Queer Sex

I am here.  I am queer.  And, my sexual activity matters!

womens march 19 1
Some lesbian women aren’t receiving Pap smears because their doctors have told them they don’t need them because lesbian sex “doesn’t count” as real sex. 

Some lesbian women aren’t receiving Pap smears because their doctors have told them they don’t need them because lesbian sex “doesn’t count” as real sex. A 2011 study from the University of Salford found that 37 percent of the queer women surveyed were told by their doctors that they didn’t need a cervical screening test. According to researchers Jennifer KatesUsha Ranji, Adara Beamesderfer, Alina Salganicoff, and Lindsey Dawson, queer women’s healthcare is also stigmatized within the medical community. Their 2018 study, “Health and Access to Care and Coverage for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Individuals in the U.S.,”published by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, notes that discrimination, violence, workplace inequality, and family rejection can create barriers to quality healthcare for LGBTQ populations, with some individuals reporting “outright denial of care” because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Part of the problem, one study indicated, is that many doctors assume their queer, bi, and lesbian patients are straight, or believe the “urban myth” that lesbian women don’t need to be tested for STIs or reproductive cancers because they don’t have heterosexual sex with cisgender men. These kinds of assumptions reinforce the misguided notion that queer women are militantly monogamous, and therefore don’t need to worry about STDs. The idea that queer sex between women isn’t “real” sex suggests that queer relationships are somehow less valuable or meaningful than heterosexual relationships—a belief that is both alienating and dangerous. Lesbian women are screened for HPV, STIs, and cervical cancer less frequently, and may not be offered the same amount of information about preventative measures like dental dams or the HPV vaccine as heterosexual patients, leading to a greater risk for cervical cancers and other reproductive health issues.

Young queer women are particularly vulnerable to contracting HPV and STIs, and according to one 2015 study, may be more likely to opt out of receiving the HPV vaccine without sufficient information from their healthcare providers. Fish’s research focused primarily on lesbian women, but bisexual women, trans women and men, and gender nonbinary individuals regularly report experiencing anxiety about disclosing their gender identity and sexual orientation. They have good reason to: Trans individuals surveyed in “Transgender Patient Perceptions of Stigma in Health Care Contexts,”  a 2013 study published in the journal Medical Care, reported being denied healthcare, or experiencing “substandard care, forced care, [and] verbal abuse.”

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The Trump administration’s plan to reinstate a Reagan-era domestic gag rule would make it illegal for healthcare providers receiving funding from Title X to refer patients to outside clinics or abortion providers. “Planned Parenthood serves 41 percent of the 4 million people who rely on the Title X program. If Planned Parenthood were pushed out of the program, the ability for those people to access free or low-cost birth control, cancer screenings, STD screenings, and other reproductive health care would be at risk,” Dean says. With growing numbers of young people identifying as queer, access to safe spaces and resources for appropriate and accurate sex education is more important than ever. Until the mainstream medical community learns to recognize queer women’s right to affordable, queer-inclusive care, Planned Parenthood will remain an essential, valuable resource.

http://www.bitchmedia.org/sofia-barrett-ibarria

 

 

Women’s March 2019

It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquility: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth. Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, to absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.

Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

 

A Woman Waits for Me

A Women Waits for Me

They are tann’d in the face by shining suns and blowing winds,

Their flesh has the old divine suppleness and strength,

They know how to swim, row, ride, wrestle, shoot, run, strike, retreat, advance, resist, defend themselves…

They are ultimate in their own right-

they are clam, clear, well-possessed of themselves.

Walt Whitman